Asian School of the Environment - Research

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Global environmental change and geohazards are threatening resources and environmental predictability that human societies rely on. The ASE researchers work towards goals such as:

  • Better sea level rise risk assessment for the millions of people living in low elevation coastal zones
  • Sustainable management of tropical peatlands for fire and haze prevention, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions
  • Improved forecasts of the magnitude and character of volcanic and earthquake activity
  • Risk assessment of unprecedented weather patterns created by climate change
  • Understanding the response of tropical marine and terrestrial ecosystems to global warming, ocean acidification, deforestation, biodiversity loss etc.

Research News

Left: Map from from Liu et al. 2020. Black arrows: present-day wind pattern. Insert: The Asian Monsoon system. Circled numbers: the three strategic cave sampling sites along the monsoon trajectory. The stars mark caves from which previous δ18O records have been sampled. Photo of Liu: NTU. Photos of speleothems and tea cultivation: Shutterstock 1084380635 and 734060971.

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Congratulations to Asst Prof Tong Ping, who has been awarded an MOE Tier 2 grant! Asst Prof Ping is jointly employed by ASE and SPMS, and his research spans several disciplines, as he uses skills from math and computing to solve problems in geophysics and earth science. The research proposed in the current grant is no different, sitting right on the interface of applied...

Last month the ASE had the pleasure of hosting Professor Sandra Diaz from the University of Cordoba, Argentina, for a week. Prof Diaz is Co-chair of the IBPES (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), which stood behind the Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services last year. The work she did for IPBES she was identified...

Left photo: Coral atoll island. Right photo: example of one of the larger fossil micoatolls underwater, this one has a live coral (the purple mound) that has settled and begun to grow upwards, but not yet reached the water surface.

 

The sea-level of the Indian Ocean is rising at a rate and magnitude nearly twice the global average, but insufficient data records have...

Dung beetles are widely used in ecological research, and the reason that they are so useful is that they are so called indicator species, meaning that their abundance and activity, for example in a rainforest site, gives a good idea of how the ecosystem is doing. As their name indicates, dung beetles are concerned with faeces, which they clear (by consuming and nesting in it), thereby...