Outreach

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The ASE serves as a knowledge bank, providing information, policy advice and input to stake holders, based on our faculty’s in-depth understanding of environmental processes.  Much of our research is conducted in South-east Asia including Singapore, which enables us to make specific predictions relevant for this region.

ASE professors regularly serve as expert commentators to media, including Straits Times, Channel News Asia and the BBC.

Outreach News

As activities gradually resume in Singapore post-circuit breaker, we know that there will still be a risk of new waves of infection and phase 3 (‘new normal’) will last indefinitely until a vaccine or treatment is found. Expanding testing capacity is one of the ways that Singapore will work to prevent future resurges of COVID-19. When we get infected the virus passes through our bodies...

Wildlife on campus.Photo: Anna Lagerström, NTU

A little while ago the Straits Times reported how Singapore was growing more wild during the circuit breaker (due to less maintenance) and the benefits of that to biodiversity. Now the BBC has picked up the story of the garden city turing more natural with grassy areas growing wild and flowering, and they quote ASE's Dr Kang Min Ngo (...

The Nanyang Research Programme Junior (NRPjr) is part of NTU’s talent outreach effort, aiming to create opportunities for secondary school students in local Integrated Programme Schools to engage in research projects with NTU faculty. Six students from Raffles Girls' School (Secondary) got the opportunity to do a study under the supervision of ASE lecturer Dr Sylvain Rigaud. Through...

Mangroves at Pulau Ubin (Shutterstock_1535723879)

Mangroves reduce the impact of storms, support great biodiversity, and play and important role in sequestering carbon. However, sea level rise is a significant threat to mangroves that can cause mangroves to drown, putting an end to their growth. A new study published last week in Science by an international team of researchers including...

Could the pandemic offer an opportunity for humankind to hit the reset button and address the environmental crisis and the climate emergency? This is what ASE Chair Prof Benjamin Horton and his father Peter Horton, Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry at the Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, suggest. Read the opinion piece in Today Online here:...